Jump to content

admin

Administrators
  • Content Count

    9,119
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    71

admin last won the day on September 16

admin had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

752 Excellent

3 Followers

About admin

  • Rank
    General

Recent Profile Visitors

1,227 profile views
  1. An unruly passenger forced an American Airlines flight from Arizona to Minnesota to make an emergency landing on Friday after the suspect allegedly told people he was on cocaine before locking himself in the airplane bathroom and eventually lighting up marijuana in the cabin, according to a report. Nearly an hour into the flight from Phoenix to Minneapolis, the pilot announced that there was "a security issue in the back," which required the flight to be diverted and land in Denver, Colorado. TMZ reported that passengers heard rumblings about a man in the back telling others on the flight he was on cocaine. Soon after, the man reportedly ran to the bathroom in the back of the plane, locking himself in for 10 minutes as flight attendants tried to get him out. As the plane was about to land, the man exited the lavatory and went back to his seat, where he was described as very jittery, according to TMZ. Once the plane was safely on the runway, a video shows the man being confronted by the flight attendance staff, as well as police officers and EMT. That's when he decided to light up what appeared to be a joint, as staff attempted to grab it, TMZ reported. The pilot was heard asking the first 13 rows of passengers to exit the plane so they could remove the man in question, who reportedly punched one of the other passengers as they attempted to exit. The unidentified man was eventually handcuffed by police, who placed him on a stretcher where he was heard screaming, "Take it off, it hurts. I'll f***ing kill you!" TMZ reported. The plane departed for Minneapolis two hours later, according to the outlet. A rep for American Airlines confirmed to Fox News on Saturday that Flight 2408 was diverted due to a "disruptive passenger" and that law enforcement me the aircraft before it re-departed. The spokesperson thanked the flight crew for taking care of the other passengers during the incident.
  2. Former Vice President Joe Biden went on the offense Saturday over President Trump’s July phone call with the president of Ukraine, in which Trump reportedly urged the leader to investigate Biden’s son’s dealings in the country -- with Biden backing calls for a House investigation and for the White House to release the transcript of the call. “Trump’s doing this because he knows I’ll beat him like a drum, and he’s using the abuse of power and every element of the presidency to try to do something to smear me,” he told reporters in Iowa. The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that, in a July phone call, Trump repeatedly asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to work with Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani on a probe into Hunter Biden. Joe Biden, now a Democratic presidential candidate, has faced scrutiny for months over his role as VP in pressuring the country to fire its top prosecutor while he was leading a corruption investigation into a natural gas company that had ties to Hunter. Giuliani has suggested that Biden, as vice president, worked to protect the company from investigation. On Saturday, Biden said that he had never spoken to Hunter about his business dealings in Ukraine, and backed calls for the House to investigate -- as well as suggesting it could begin a path to impeachment. “Depending on what the House finds, he could be impeached but I’m not making that judgment now,” he said. “The House should investigate it, this appears to be an overwhelming abuse of power.” He went on to call Trump a “serial abuser.” “He abuses power everywhere he can and if he sees any threat to staying in power, he’ll do whatever he has to do -- but this crosses the line,” he said. Biden’s remarks came just hours after Trump dismissed the controversy as a “Ukraine Witch Hunt” being stoked by the Democratic Party and the “fake news media,” and said that the real scandal was to do with Biden’s interactions in the country. “The Fake News Media and their partner, the Democrat Party, want to stay as far away as possible from the Joe Biden demand that the Ukrainian Government fire a prosecutor who was investigating his son, or they won’t get a very large amount of U.S. money, so they fabricate a.story about me and a perfectly fine and routine conversation I had with the new President of the Ukraine,” he tweeted. 21.1K people are talking about this “Nothing was said that was in any way wrong, but Biden’s demand, on the other hand, was a complete and total disaster. The Fake News knows this but doesn’t want to report!” What initially touched off the controversy is a secret whistleblower complaint that the director of national intelligence has kept from Congress, reportedly involving a "promise" Trump made to an unnamed foreign leader. Trump dismissed the story as “ridiculous" and a "partisan hack job" from the Oval Office on Friday and said his calls with foreign leaders are “always appropriate.” 24.8K people are talking about this The whistleblower complaint led House Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff, D-Calif., and other Democrats to call for an investigation and for the administration hand over the complaint as well as a transcript of the call -- even as acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire declined to share details with lawmakers. Maguire is expected to testify publicly about the whistleblower complaint on Sept. 26. after being subpoenaed by the House intelligence committee. Schiff had accused Maguire of withholding a whistleblower complaint from Congress and questioned whether he had been directed to do so by the White House or the attorney general. On Saturday Trump said that the media was turning the story into one about him, as they are trying to “protect” the Democratic frontrunner. “Now that the Democrats and the Fake News Media have gone ‘bust’ on every other of their Witch Hunt schemes, they are trying to start one just as ridiculous as the others, call it the Ukraine Witch Hunt, while at the same time trying to protect Sleepy Joe Biden,” he tweeted. “Will fail again!”
  3. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  4. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  5. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  6. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  7. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  8. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  9. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  10. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  11. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  12. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  13. Need a killer podcast intro our outro? Youtube? Discord? Kramer's gotcha! Kramer is now on FIVERR, exclusively. Do you do a podcast? Do you need a commercial? Do you need a sweeper? Well, we're back on Fiverr after requests over the last many months. It's CHEAP! CLICK HERE! CLICK HERE! Edited just now by admin
  14. COLUMBUS — Georgia senators on Friday began considering whether to restore the voting rights of many of the state’s 250,000 felons, especially those who were convicted of nonviolent crimes But it remained unclear which crimes would be minor enough for offenders to be able to vote, and senators reached no conclusions about whether felons should regain their rights before they’ve paid off fines and fees. Georgia is one of 22 states that denies felons the ability to vote even after they’ve been released from prison, requiring them to also complete parole, probation and pay fines and fees. State Sen. Randy Robertson, the chairman of a committee studying the issue, said it’s important for the Senate to evaluate whether felons should be able to vote. “I would hope I’m not wasting my time today on something that’s fruitless,” Robertson, a Republican from Cataula and a former sheriff’s deputy, said after the committee’s meeting at Columbus State University. “Victims are going to have their voices heard, too. … Just starting the conversation is a big step forward.” ADVERTISING inRead invented by Teads Senators and criminal justice groups appeared to agree that those convicted of drug possession charges should be able to vote when they’re freed from prison. It’s unclear whether other offenses, such as drug distribution, shoplifting and burglary, would qualify. Most of Georgia’s felons, about 80%, are already living in their communities while finishing their probation or parole, said Maxwell Ruppersburg, the executive director of Reform Georgia, an organization focused on reducing incarceration. “They paid their dues to society. Their sentence has been completed. If that’s true, why are we here having this discussion?” asked Paulette Hunt, a retired veteran who spoke during the public comment portion of the meeting. “Where is their justice? The punishment must fit the crime.” All felons in Georgia are allowed to re-register to vote after they’ve finished all the conditions of their sentences, but that can take many years. Probation sentences in Georgia last an average of 6.3 years, nearly double the national average, Ruppersburg said. Alton Russell, the chairman of the Muscogee County Republican Committee, told senators that criminals lose their voting rights as a consequence of their actions. “If somebody commits a crime and they’re sentenced, they’ve earned the right not to vote,” Russell said. Georgia lawmakers will decide among several options for restoring felons’ voting rights. They could simply exempt drug possession felonies, as proposed under Senate Bill 11. That measure, introduced by state Sen. Harold Jones, a Democratic member of the study committee representing Augusta, is still pending in the Georgia Senate after it didn’t receive a hearing this year. Legislators could also pass a bill defining which crimes are serious enough to result in a loss of voting rights. The Georgia Constitution says those who have been convicted of a “felony involving moral turpitude” can’t be registered to vote until their sentences are completed. But the state hasn’t defined which felonies involve “moral turpitude,” and election officials interpret the Constitution to mean that all felonies limit voting rights. Another option for lawmakers would restore voting rights when felons are released from prison or jail but still owe fines or fees. “I don’t see how you can say we’re going to take someone off the voting rolls when they’re productive citizens in every other sense of the word,” Jones said. Sara Totonchi, the executive director for the Southern Center for Human Rights, said restoration of voting rights reduces the chance of recidivism as former criminals adjust to life after prison. “It makes it so much harder for people who have heavy fines and fees to re-integrate into society,” Totonchi said. The Senate committee plans to meet twice more this fall before making recommendations by December.
  15. WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump urged the new leader of Ukraine this summer to investigate the son of former Vice President Joe Biden, a person familiar with the matter said Friday. Democrats condemned what they saw as a clear effort to damage a political rival, now at the heart of an explosive whistleblower complaint against Trump. It was the latest revelation in an escalating controversy that has created a showdown between congressional Democrats and the Trump administration, which has refused to turn over the formal complaint by a national security official or even describe its contents. Trump defended himself Friday against the intelligence official’s complaint, angrily declaring it came from a “partisan whistleblower,” though he also said he didn’t know who had made it. The complaint was based on a series of events, one of which was a July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, according to a two people familiar with the matter. The people were not authorized to discuss the issue by name and were granted anonymity. Trump, in that call, urged Zelenskiy to probe the activities of potential Democratic rival Biden’s son Hunter, who worked for a Ukrainian gas company, according to one of the people, who was briefed on the call. Trump did not raise the issue of U.S. aid to Ukraine, indicating there was not an explicit quid pro quo, according to the person. Biden reacted strongly late Friday, saying that if the reports are true, “then there is truly no bottom to President Trump’s willingness to abuse his power and abase our country.” He said Trump should release the transcript of his July phone conversation with Zelenskiy “so that the American people can judge for themselves.” The government’s intelligence inspector general has described the whistleblower’s Aug. 12 complaint as “serious” and “urgent.” But Trump dismissed it all Friday, insisting “it’s nothing.” He scolded reporters for asking about it and said it was “just another political hack job.” “I have conversations with many leaders. It’s always appropriate. Always appropriate,” Trump said. “At the highest level always appropriate. And anything I do, I fight for this country.” Trump, who took questions in the Oval Office alongside Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, whom he was hosting for a state visit, was asked if he knew if the whistleblower’s complaint centered on his July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Zelenskiy. The president responded, “I really don’t know,” but he continued to insist any phone call he made with a head of state was “perfectly fine and respectful.” Trump was asked Friday if he brought up Biden in the call with Zelenskiy, and he answered, “It doesn’t matter what I discussed.” But then he used the moment to urge the media “to look into” Biden’s background with Ukraine. There has yet to be any evidence of any wrongdoing by Biden or his son regarding Ukraine. Trump and Zelenskiy are to meet on the sidelines of the United Nations next week. The Wall Street Journal first reported that Trump pressed Zelenskiy about Biden. The standoff with Congress raises fresh questions about the extent to which Trump’s appointees are protecting the Republican president from oversight and, specifically, whether his new acting director of national intelligence, Joseph Maguire, is working with the Justice Department to shield the president. Democrats say the administration is legally required to give Congress access to the whistleblower’s complaint, and Rep. Adam Schiff of California has said he will go to court in an effort to get it if necessary. The intelligence community’s inspector general said the matter involves the “most significant” responsibilities of intelligence leadership. House Democrats also are fighting the administration for access to witnesses and documents in impeachment probes. In the whistleblower case, lawmakers are looking into whether Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani traveled to Ukraine to pressure the government to aid the president’s reelection effort by investigating the activities of Biden’s son. During a rambling interview Thursday on CNN, Giuliani was asked whether he had asked Ukraine to look into Biden. He initially said, “No, actually I didn’t,” but seconds later he said, “Of course I did.” Giuliani has spent months trying to drum up potentially damaging evidence about Biden’s ties to Ukraine. He told CNN that Trump was unaware of his actions. “I did what I did on my own,” he said. “I told him about it afterward. Still later, Giuliani tweeted, “A President telling a Pres-elect of a well known corrupt country he better investigate corruption that affects US is doing his job.” Democrats have contended that Trump, in the aftermath of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, may have asked for foreign assistance in his upcoming reelection bid. Trump further stoked those concerns earlier this year in an interview when he suggested he would be open to receiving foreign help. The inspector general appeared before the House intelligence committee behind closed doors Thursday but declined, under administration orders, to reveal to members the substance of the complaint. Schiff, a California Democrat, said Trump’s attack on the whistleblower was disturbing and raised concerns that it would have a chilling effect on other potential exposers of wrongdoing. He also said it was “deeply disturbing” that the White House appeared to know more about the complaint than its intended recipient -- Congress. The information “deserves a thorough investigation,” Schiff said. “Come hell or high water, that’s what we’re going to do.” Among the materials Democrats have sought is a transcript of Trump’s July 25 call with Zelenskiy. The call took place one day after Mueller’s faltering testimony to Congress effectively ended the threat his probe posed to the White House. A readout of the call released from the Ukrainian government said Trump believed Kyiv could complete corruptions investigations that have hampered relations between the two nations but did not get into specifics. Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut, who in May called for a probe of Giuliani’s effort in Ukraine, said in an interview on Friday it’s “outrageous” the president has been sending his political operative to talk to Ukraine’s new president. Murphy tweeted that during his own visit it was clear to him that Ukraine officials were “worried about the consequences of ignoring Giuliani’s demands.” The senator tweeted that he told Zelenskiy during their August visit it was “best to ignore requests from Trump’s campaign operatives. He agreed.” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Trump faces “serious repercussions” if reports about the complaint are accurate. She said it raises “grave, urgent concerns for our national security.” Letters to Congress from the inspector general make clear that Maguire consulted with the Justice Department in deciding not to transmit the complaint to Congress in a further departure from standard procedure. It’s unclear whether the White House was also involved, Schiff said. Maguire has refused to discuss details of the whistleblower complaint, but he has been subpoenaed by the House panel and is expected to testify publicly next Thursday. Maguire and the inspector general, Michael Atkinson, also are expected next week at the Senate intelligence committee. Atkinson wrote in letters that Schiff released that he and Maguire had hit an “impasse” over the acting director’s decision not to share the complaint with Congress. Atkinson said he was told by the legal counsel for the intelligence director that the complaint did not actually meet the definition of an “urgent concern.” And he said the Justice Department said it did not fall under the director’s jurisdiction because it did not involve an intelligence professional. Atkinson said he disagreed with that Justice Department view. The complaint “not only falls under DNI’s jurisdiction,” Atkinson wrote, “but relates to one of the most significant and important of DNI’s responsibilities to the American people.”
×
×
  • Create New...