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  1. PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – Eight people have been killed and a number of others injured after a shooting situation at The Tree of Life Synagogue in Squirrel Hill on Saturday. KDKA’s Meghan Schiller reports that a suspect, a white male, has surrendered. The SWAT team had been talking with the suspect, and he was crawling and injured. It is unclear the extent of his injuries. Three police officers were also shot. their conditions are currently unknown. Police sources tell KDKA’s Andy Sheehan the gunman walked into the building and yelled, “All Jews Must die.” Sheehan confirmed that eight people were confirmed dead. Others had been shot but the extent of their injuries in unknown at this time. Photo Credit: Tim Lawson/KDKA President Donald Trump Tweeted his thoughts to the Pittsburgh area amid the tragedy. Twitter Ads info and privacy When officers arrived, the gunman reportedly shot at them, forcing officers to use their vehicles as a shield. The shooting happened during weekly Shabbat services at the conservative Jewish Synagogue, the building was full was full of people for a Saturday service and police say they’ve received several calls from people barricaded inside the Synagogue. Photo Credit: KDKA Two of Pittsburgh’s professional sports teams, the Steelers and Penguins, Tweeted their thoughts and prayers to the victims. Twitter Ads info and privacy Twitter Ads info and privacy Stay with KDKA.com for this developing story.
  2. BREAKING NEWS

    BREAKING NEWS: MICHAEL WILL BE A CATEGORY 3!

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  3. BREAKING NEWS

    3 Things You Should Know About Hurricane Michael

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  4. Update at 11:10 am. Hurricane Hermine made landfall in the Big Bend area of Florida in 2016. It came ashore with maximum sustained winds around 80 mph with a central pressure of 982 mph (Category 1). As I write this, the same region is staring at the very real possibility of a strong category two or major hurricane (Category 3 or higher) making landfall in the Wednesday-Thursday time frame this week. When I think back to the widespread power outages (roughly 80% of the population in Tallahassee, Florida) and downed trees from Hermine, I become very concerned. The peak gusts in that storm were in the 60+ mph range for the most populated areas. Places like my three-time Alma Mater that trained me as a physical meteorologist, Florida State University, were shut down for nearly a week or longer. The Hurricane Hermine context was important as I point out three things you need to know about Michael. Tropical Storm Michael as it creeps toward the Gulf of Mexico as daybreak approaches.NOAA/CIRA It is rapidly intensifying. Over the weekend, one of the weather models, the NOAA H-WRF, was hinting at the possibility of a major storm making landfall in Florida. The European and GFS models all started trending toward a stronger storm as well even though the official forecast over the weekend kept the storm in the Category 1-2 range. In a Forbes piece that I wrote over the weekend, I left the door open to the possibility of a stronger storm. As I review meteorological data on Monday morning, I see some ominous signs. First, let's review the wording of the National Hurricane Center 4 am CDT discussion: YOU MAY ALSO LIKE Deloitte BRANDVOICE Changing Minds Without Twisting Arms NVIDIA BRANDVOICE How To Plan Today For Tomorrow’s AI-Powered Cars FORBES INSIGHTS Cover Your Assets: The Rise Of The Super-Intelligent Supply Chain Hurricane Michael has formed.CIMSS TROPICAL WEBSITE That meteorological jargon basically says "oh crap" this things is strengthen rapidly. I would not be surprised at all if Tropical Storm Michael is already classified as a hurricane by the time you read this or shortly thereafter (Note: It has). There is further language in the discussion that also worries me, Sea surface temperatures in the Gulf of MexicoCIMSS TROPICAL WEBPAGE What is particularly interesting from a meteorological perspective is that Michael rapidly intensified in a region of fairly significant wind shear. This shear is still affecting the symmetry of the storm, and there is a fairly large radius of wind. Early Monday morning flights into the storm have found no evidence of hurricane-strength winds yet. However, the storm will eventually move into a region of less shear, which is typically more conducive for development. The waters of the Gulf of Mexico (above) are very warm and can provide ample fuel for this tropical heat engine. A potentially strong wind field threatens populated areas in the region. I started this piece with the context about Hurricane Hermine (2016) because it was a high-impact event for Tallahassee and surrounding Florida. Michael looks to be a stronger storm. Weathermodels.com tropical expert Dr. Ryan Maue tweeted Monday morning, "the excellent ECMWF model landfalls Michael into the Florida Big Bend east of Panama City or SW of Tallahassee on Thursday as a major hurricane (941 mb pressure). He also directly mentions something that I alluded to earlier in this piece about Hermine.He tweeted, "Hurricane Michael at Cat 3+ near landfall would bring disastrous winds inland to Tallahassee -- largest population metro under threat." By the way, Tallahassee is also the center of Florida's political universe as mid-term elections approach. Projected peak wind gusts projected by the European model, one of the best in the world.DR. RYAN MAUE VIA TWITTER The peak wind gusts (above) projected by the European model bring a swath of 80 to 90+ mph winds into the affected region by Thursday or Friday. People and emergency managers in parts of Central and South Georgia, including Valdosta and Savannah, should also note the potential for near hurricane-strength winds. The actual location of the peak wind swath will depend upon the track so it could shift a bit in the next 1-3 days. Even places like the Atlanta metro area should keep a close eye on subtle changes. A slight jog west could significantly increase the wind and rainfall threat there. Tree down on the campus of Florida State University after Hurricane Hermine (2016)NWS TALLAHASSEE The 'usual impacts' and hurricane amnesia. If there is any good news, this storm will not stall like Hurricane Florence (2018) or Hurricane Harvey (2107). While rainfall will not be measured in multiple feet, 4 to 8 inches are certainly possible along the path of the storm. Additionally, storm surge will be a threat to coastal regions. NOAA has issued storm surge watches for the Big Bend region of Florida. To make matters worse, this part of Florida is particularly vulnerable to storm surge because of the continental shelf and the shape of the coastline (graphic below). The other concern is that the panhandle of Florida has not experienced a major hurricane in well over 10 years. For context, iPhones had not been released when Hurricane Dennis impacted the panhandle in 2005. If Hurricane Michale becomes a major hurricane, there is the real threat of "major hurricane amnesia." If you have not experienced something in nearly 13 years, do you remember what it is like or how to prepare? And with the rapid growth of the coastal communities around Destin and Panama City, there are certainly new residents that have not experienced a major hurricane at all. Watch this storm closely. The window to prepare or evacuate is closing.
  5. BREAKING NEWS

    BREAKING NEWS: MICHAEL WILL BE A CATEGORY 3!

    Michael is currently centered about 90 miles east of Cozumel, Mexico, and is moving northward. (LATEST NEWS: State of Emergency Declared as Florida Prepares for Michael) Outer rainbands from Michael are already soaking the Florida Keys, and rainfall totals of 2 to 4 inches are likely there through Tuesday. Michael rapidly intensified from Sunday 5 a.m. EDT to Monday 5 a.m. EDT when its winds increased from 35 mph to 70 mph in that 24 hour period. Current Storm Status (The highest cloud tops, corresponding to the most vigorous convection, are shown in the brightest red colors. Clustering, deep convection around the center is a sign of a healthy tropical cyclone.) A hurricane watch is now posted for the northeast Gulf Coast from the Alabama/Florida border to Suwanee River, Florida. This includes Pensacola, Panama City and Tallahassee. Hurricane watches are issued 48 hours before the arrival of tropical-storm-force winds which is when outside preparations become dangerous. Tropical storm watches are in effect from Suwanee River, Florida, to Anna Maria Island, Florida, including Tampa Bay. Also in a tropical storm watch is a swath from the Alabama/Florida border to the Mississippi/Alabama border as well as inland areas of southern Alabama and southwest Georgia. Alerts (From the National Hurricane Center.) A storm surge watch has been hoisted from Navarre, Florida, to Anna Maria Island, Florida, including Tampa Bay. This means life-threatening storm surge inundation is possible in the watch area within 48 hours. Storm Surge Watches (From the National Hurricane Center.) Interests along the northeastern Gulf Coast in the path of Michael should be making preparations. Follow the advice of local officials if you are ordered to evacuate, particularly if you live in a storm surge prone location. Forecast: U.S. Gulf Coast Threat Midweek Forecast guidance is unanimous that Michael will be drawn northward through the Gulf of Mexico and pose a threat to the northeastern Gulf Coast by Tuesday night or Wednesday. Projected Path (The red-shaded area denotes the potential path of the center of the tropical cyclone. Note that impacts (particularly heavy rain, high surf, coastal flooding) with any tropical cyclone may spread beyond its forecast path.) Michael is expected to become a hurricane on Monday and will continue to intensify early this week, potentially approaching major hurricane strength before it makes landfall. This will be due to a combination of increasingly favorable upper-level winds and above average sea-surface temperatures along Michael's path. Here's a general overview of what we know right now. Timing - Landfall is most likely to occur somewhere between the Florida Panhandle and the Big Bend of Florida Wednesday into Wednesday night. Depending on how quickly or slowly Michael begins to turn northeast, landfall could be delayed until early Thursday. - Conditions could begin to deteriorate as early as Tuesday night on the northeast Gulf Coast. - After landfall, Michael will then move farther inland across the southeastern U.S. into late-week. Intensity - The National Hurricane Center is forecasting Michael to be a Category 2 hurricane when it makes landfall. However, the intensity forecast is uncertain, and Michael could be slightly weaker or even stronger than that at landfall. There is a chance Michael could be near major hurricane strength (Category 3+) when it approaches the coast. Wind - Hurricane-force winds (74-plus mph) could arrive in the hurricane watch area on the northeast Gulf Coast by Wednesday. - Tropical-storm-force winds (39-plus mph) are most likely to arrive in the tropical storm watch area on the northeastern Gulf Coast by Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. - Widespread power outages, tree damage and structural damage could occur along the path of Michael near and just inland from where it makes landfall on the northeastern Gulf Coast. - Windy conditions may extend farther inland across parts of the Southeast as Michael moves northeast, including parts of southern Alabama, Georgia and the Carolinas. Although there is uncertainty with the strength of winds across inland locations, there could be scattered tree damage and scattered power outages. Tropical-Storm-Force Wind Probabilities (The contours above show the chance of tropical-storm-force winds (at least 39 mph), according to the latest forecast by the National Hurricane Center. Probabilities can increase or decrease over time.) Storm Surge - Dangerous storm surge flooding will occur along the immediate coastline near and east of where the center makes landfall. - Michael is expected to affect portions of the Florida Gulf coast that are especially vulnerable to storm surge, particularly Apalachee Bay south of Tallahassee. The National Hurricane Center says water levels on the coast could reach the following heights if the peak storm surge arrives at high tide: Indian Pass to Crystal River: 7 to 11 feet Crystal River to Anclote River: 4 to 6 feet Okaloosa/Walton County Line to Indian Pass 4 to 7 feet Anclote River to Anna Maria Island including Tampa Bay: 2 to 4 ft Navarre to Okaloosa/Walton County Line: 2 to 4 feet Storm Surge Forecast (From the National Hurricane Center.) Here are the high tides for Wednesday and Thursday for a few locations in the storm surge threat area (all times are local): Panama City: 10:30 p.m. on Wednesday | 11:00 p.m. on Thursday Apalachicola: 4:39 a.m. and 6:10 p.m. on Wednesday | 4:58 a.m. and 7:04 p.m. on Thursday Cedar Key: 2:48 a.m. and 3:36 p.m. on Wednesday | 3:18 a.m. and 4:19 p.m. on Thursday Tampa Bay/St. Petersburg: 2:46 a.m. and 4:06 p.m. on Wednesday | 3:09 a.m. and 4:55 p.m. on Thursday On the Southeast coast, onshore winds and high astronomical tides will also lead to some coastal flooding this week. Charleston Harbor is forecast to see minor to moderate coastal flooding at high tide. Rainfall - Heavy rain is likely to spread inland from the northeastern Gulf Coast midweek to other parts of the southeastern U.S. into late-week. - Rainfall totals of 4 to 8 inches are forecast from the Florida Panhandle into southern Georgia, according to the National Hurricane Center. Locally up to a foot of rain is possible. This may cause life-threatening flash flooding in some areas. - Some heavy rain could affect parts of the Carolinas that were devastated by flooding from Hurricane Florence. That said, this system is unlikely to stall like Florence did and will, therefore, not bring extreme rainfall amounts. Some flooding could still occur there, but details are uncertain this far out in time. Rainfall Forecast (This should be interpreted as a broad outlook of where the heaviest rain may fall. Higher amounts may occur where bands of rain stall over a period of a few hours.) Tornadoes - As is typical with landfalling hurricanes, isolated tornadoes will be a threat on the eastern side of the storm. - A tornado threat may develop in the Florida Panhandle and southern Georgia by Wednesday. Check back with weather.com throughout the week ahead for more details on the forecast for Michael. Cuba and Mexico Impact A hurricane warning is now effect for the Pinar del Rio Province in western Cuba. Hurricane conditions are possible there later Monday. Tropical storm warnings have been posted for Isle of Youth, Cuba, and Mexico's northeastern Yucatan Peninsula, including Cozumel. Rainfall totals of 4 to 8 inches (locally 12 inches) are forecast over western Cuba, with 1 to 2 inches over the northeast Yucatan Peninsula. These downpours could contribute to life-threatening flash flooding and mudslides, particularly in areas of mountainous terrain.
  6. BREAKING NEWS

    BREAKING NEWS: HURRICANE MICHAEL

    ATLANTA — A fast-moving tropical cyclone strengthened into Hurricane Michael on Monday and threatened to strike Florida as soon as Wednesday, imperiling a vast stretch of the state with little notice. The system’s risks also extend hundreds of miles inland, and it is poised to bombard parts of the South and Mid-Atlantic as a tropical storm, endangering regions still recovering from Hurricane Florence’s deluge last month. In an advisory on Monday morning, the National Hurricane Center suggested the storm would make landfall on Wednesday as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of at least 111 miles per hour. “This storm will be life-threatening and extremely dangerous,” Gov. Rick Scott of Florida said at a televised news conference in Southport, Fla., just north of Panama City. “Michael can still change direction and impact any part of the state,” said Mr. Scott, who warned that some areas could receive up to a foot of rain, and that destructive winds were likely to hit both along the coast, in places like Panama City, and inland, including Tallahassee, the capital. Local officials were considering whether to order evacuations from some communities. Within hours of Mr. Scott’s appearance in Southport, the hurricane center said the storm was about 140 miles east-northeast of Cozumel, Mexico, with maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour, just above the threshold to be classified as a hurricane. The storm was moving north at 7 miles per hour, leading to watches and warnings in Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A hurricane warning was in effect for Pinar del Rio, a province in western Cuba, and a hurricane watch was posted from the Alabama-Florida border to the Suwannee River in Florida. “Steady to rapid strengthening is forecast during the next day or so, and Michael is forecast to become a major hurricane by Tuesday or Tuesday night,” the hurricane center said Monday. But federal and state officials have increasingly been instructing residents not to judge storms solely by their categorization under the Saffir-Simpson scale, which is based only on wind speed. With Hurricane Michael, they are particularly concerned about storm surge in a region especially vulnerable to it, warning of a surge of 8 to 12 feet in some areas. If the storm does make landfall as expected, it would be the strongest tropical cyclone to hit the mainland United States so far this year. Although Hurricane Florence once appeared likely to strike with catastrophic winds, it ultimately made its landfall as a Category 1 hurricane. Storm preparations began over the weekend in Florida, as the weather system rapidly became a tropical depression and then a tropical storm. And as the hours passed, the forecast worsened for a system that just days ago was uncertain even to form into this Atlantic hurricane season’s 13th named storm.
  7. ATLANTA — A fast-moving tropical cyclone strengthened into Hurricane Michael on Monday and threatened to strike Florida as soon as Wednesday, imperiling a vast stretch of the state with little notice. The system’s risks also extend hundreds of miles inland, and it is poised to bombard parts of the South and Mid-Atlantic as a tropical storm, endangering regions still recovering from Hurricane Florence’s deluge last month. In an advisory on Monday morning, the National Hurricane Center suggested the storm would make landfall on Wednesday as a Category 3 hurricane, with sustained winds of at least 111 miles per hour. “This storm will be life-threatening and extremely dangerous,” Gov. Rick Scott of Florida said at a televised news conference in Southport, Fla., just north of Panama City. “Michael can still change direction and impact any part of the state,” said Mr. Scott, who warned that some areas could receive up to a foot of rain, and that destructive winds were likely to hit both along the coast, in places like Panama City, and inland, including Tallahassee, the capital. Local officials were considering whether to order evacuations from some communities. Within hours of Mr. Scott’s appearance in Southport, the hurricane center said the storm was about 140 miles east-northeast of Cozumel, Mexico, with maximum sustained winds of 75 miles per hour, just above the threshold to be classified as a hurricane. The storm was moving north at 7 miles per hour, leading to watches and warnings in Cuba, Mexico and the United States. A hurricane warning was in effect for Pinar del Rio, a province in western Cuba, and a hurricane watch was posted from the Alabama-Florida border to the Suwannee River in Florida. “Steady to rapid strengthening is forecast during the next day or so, and Michael is forecast to become a major hurricane by Tuesday or Tuesday night,” the hurricane center said Monday. But federal and state officials have increasingly been instructing residents not to judge storms solely by their categorization under the Saffir-Simpson scale, which is based only on wind speed. With Hurricane Michael, they are particularly concerned about storm surge in a region especially vulnerable to it, warning of a surge of 8 to 12 feet in some areas. If the storm does make landfall as expected, it would be the strongest tropical cyclone to hit the mainland United States so far this year. Although Hurricane Florence once appeared likely to strike with catastrophic winds, it ultimately made its landfall as a Category 1 hurricane. Storm preparations began over the weekend in Florida, as the weather system rapidly became a tropical depression and then a tropical storm. And as the hours passed, the forecast worsened for a system that just days ago was uncertain even to form into this Atlantic hurricane season’s 13th named storm.
  8. BREAKING NEWS

    BREAKING NEWS: HURRICANE MICHAEL

    The National Hurricane Center states it’s still too soon to forecast an exact point of landfall or impact for Michael, but the northern Gulf Coast should brace for possible dangerous storm surge, rain and wind impacts by mid-week. PANAMA CITY — Residents in the Florida Panhandle and Gulf Coast should check their hurricane kits, as the season’s newest storm, Michael, will likely hit the region Wednesday as a hurricane. Current National Hurricane Center projections show the storm making landfall somewhere between Port St. Joe and Apalachicola at around 1 p.m. Wednesday at a Category 2 storm — with up to 100mph sustained winds. Tropical Storm-force winds could arrive in Bay County as soon as Tuesday night. Some models, however, show the storm taking a straighter track with Panama City in its sights. On Sunday, Gov. Rick Scott declared a State of Emergency for the Florida Panhandle and Big Bend region. The State Emergency Operations Center will activated to Level 2 Sunday morning, which means the State Emergency Response Team (SERT) has activated, enhancing coordination between federal, state and local emergency management agencies, according to a press release.
  9. BREAKING NEWS

    BREAKING NEWS: HURRICANE MICHAEL

    We are closely watching recently named Tropical Storm Michael. Located in the Western Caribbean, Michael is already producing heavy rain between Central America and Hispaniola with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour. U.S. Air Force Hurricane Hunters are scheduled to investigate the storm today. According to the National Hurricane Center, it is expected to move into the Gulf of Mexico on Monday where it will gradually strengthen. Michael will enter an environment that is favorable for development as it moves into the southern Gulf of Mexico. Warm sea surface temperatures combined with low wind shear will help to fuel the continual development of this system. The latest computer models suggest the system will strengthen into a hurricane and make landfall between Southwest Alabama coast to the Big Bend of Florida on Wednesday. There is a large amount of uncertainty in the forecast, so changes in timing, strength, and track are expected. Hurricane watches and warnings are expected to be issued by the National Hurricane Center within the next 24 hours. =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-= While you're here . . . The Kramer family are ready to show you a good time! BACKYARD CINEMA PC is ready to make your party memorable. Wanna show a movie in your backyard to friends, family and neighbors? USE US! Click here for more. =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-==-=-= This system could bring storm surge, rain, and wind impacts to the northern and northeastern Gulf Coast. Regardless of where it may make landfall, it is important to be prepared as impacts can be felt far from the center of the storm. People living along the Gulf Coast should review any hurricane plans this weekend. The Atlantic hurricane season officially ends November 30. WEAR-TV will have the latest updates on-air and online.
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